The Liverpool Telescope is a 2.0 metre unmanned fully robotic telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos on the Canary island of La Palma. It is owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University, with financial support from STFC.

Latest News from the LT
SG
The LT draws in the crowds at StarGazing Live 2015

Jon Marchant of the Liverpool Telescope group was joined by Astrophysics Research Institute astronomers Matt Darnley and Simon Prentice at this year's StarGazing Live event in Leicester. Hosted by the BBC, the event coincided with a spectacular partial solar eclipse witnessed by millions of people in the UK and across Europe. The day was split into a morning session of eclipse watching, followed by an evening of star-gazing from the Racecourse at Leicester and the fields surrounding Jodrell Bank. Although the eclipse's path of totality missed mainland Britain, those watching were still able to enjoy a deep partial eclipse, with 85-95% of the Sun's diameter being covered by the Moon, depending on the viewer's location in the UK.
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RAS
Time domain astronomy at NAM-2015

The LT Group and Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University have once again organised two sessions at the U.K.'s National Astronomy Meeting. Hosted by the Royal Astronomical Society, NAM-2015 will be held at Venue Cymru in Llandudno, North Wales. As part of the week-long festivities, two 90 minute sessions are being organised which will focus on time domain astronomy with robotic telescopes. These sessions will be held on Thursday, 9 July, at 9 am and 1.30 pm. The meeting website is open for registration and the deadline for submission of abstracts by prospective oral or poster presenters is 14 April, 2015. Further details are available at the official NAM-2015 website.
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SPRAT
EWASS-2015 Special Session on robotic telescopes and instrumentation for time domain astronomy

The upcoming European Week of Astronomy and Space Science (EWASS) will include a Special Session, led by LT staff, entitled Robotic Telescopes and Instrumentation for Time Domain Astronomy. EWASS 2015 is organised by the European Astronomical Society and will be held in Tenerife, Spain, from June 22 to 26, 2015. The aim of the session is to address how current and future robotic facilities meet the scientific needs of the European time domain community. The session will feature talks on scientific results as well as new and existing robotic facilities and instrumentation covering all areas of time domain astronomy. A discussion of the technical and software challenges of robotic response will also be encouraged.
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TDE
Black hole caught having a snack

We don't as yet know very much about black holes, but one thing we do know is that it's not a good idea to get too close to one of them! Their powerful gravitational pull can rip apart anything that passes nearby. Yet a star may have survived such a close encounter, an encounter that was recently observed by Dr David Bersier of LJMU's Astrophysics Research Institute and his colleagues using the Liverpool Telescope.
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SPRAT
Rapid SPRAT confirmation of a Gaia transient: it's a dwarf nova!

One of the secondary goals of the Gaia Space Telescope is to survey the whole sky for variables and transients, objects that suddenly increase in brightness. The Gaia Photometric Science Alerts programme hosted by Cambridge University in the U.K. has recently gone public, and one of the first alerts released has been robotically observed by the Liverpool Telescope. As part of a campaign of rapid follow-up observations with the newly-commissioned SPRAT spectrograph, a group of LJMU astronomers have just released the first Astronomer's Telegram based on a Gaia transient alert.
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SPRAT
LT discovers the sixth eruption of a remarkable Recurrent Nova in M31

The LT has in recent weeks been doing what it does best: making exciting discoveries in time domain astronomy! A team led by Dr Matt Darnley of the Astrophysics Research Institute at LJMU has detected the latest eruption of a remarkable Recurrent Nova (RN) in the nearby galaxy M31. This object is particularly noteworthy because of the frequency of its eruptions. Most RNe undergo an outburst once every 10-100 years; the RN in M31 seems to erupt annually. Darnley and his team were the first to spot the latest eruption of the nova and, thanks to the LT's robotic capabilities, have been able to monitor the event with images and spectra obtained every few hours/days over a period of a few weeks. They have certainly not let the grass grow under their feet, having made full use of the recently-commissioned optical spectrograph, SPRAT.
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