The Liverpool Telescope is a 2.0 metre unmanned fully robotic telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos on the Canary island of La Palma. It is owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University, with financial support from STFC.

RAS Specialist Discussion on the Liverpool Telescope and Liverpool Telescope 2. The presentations from the meeting are available as PDF files here.

Latest News
TDE
Black hole caught having a snack
1600 GMT 18 Nov 2014

We don't as yet know very much about black holes, but one thing we do know is that it's not a good idea to get too close to one of them! Their powerful gravitational pull can rip apart anything that passes nearby. Yet a star may have survived such a close encounter, an encounter that was recently observed by Dr David Bersier of LJMU's Astrophysics Research Institute and his colleagues using the Liverpool Telescope.
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SPRAT
Rapid SPRAT confirmation of a Gaia transient: it's a dwarf nova!
1200 GMT 16 Oct 2014

One of the secondary goals of the Gaia Space Telescope is to survey the whole sky for variables and transients, objects that suddenly increase in brightness. The Gaia Photometric Science Alerts programme hosted by Cambridge University in the U.K. has recently gone public, and one of the first alerts released has been robotically observed by the Liverpool Telescope. As part of a campaign of rapid follow-up observations with the newly-commissioned SPRAT spectrograph, a group of LJMU astronomers have just released the first Astronomer's Telegram based on a Gaia transient alert.
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SPRAT
LT discovers the sixth eruption of a remarkable Recurrent Nova in M31
1700 GMT 14 Oct 2014

The LT has in recent weeks been doing what it does best: making exciting discoveries in time domain astronomy! A team led by Dr Matt Darnley of the Astrophysics Research Institute at LJMU has detected the latest eruption of a remarkable Recurrent Nova (RN) in the nearby galaxy M31. This object is particularly noteworthy because of the frequency of its eruptions. Most RNe undergo an outburst once every 10-100 years; the RN in M31 seems to erupt annually. Darnley and his team were the first to spot the latest eruption of the nova and, thanks to the LT's robotic capabilities, have been able to monitor the event with images and spectra obtained every few hours/days over a period of a few weeks. They have certainly not let the grass grow under their feet, having made full use of the recently-commissioned optical spectrograph, SPRAT.
[full story]

SPRAT
LJMU scientists announce the arrival of SPRAT, an exciting new instrument on the Liverpool Telescope
1300 GMT 5 Sep 2014

Astronomers from the Astrophysics Research Institute (ARI) of Liverpool John Moores University recently announced the successful commissioning of an exciting new instrument on the Liverpool Telescope to colleagues and collaborators at an international conference in Poland. The conference, which was held in Warsaw in early September, brought together researchers from across Europe who are interested in observing variables and "transients" - objects that vary in brightness suddenly and dramatically. The meeting focused on objects that will be discovered with the GAIA space telescope, an ESA mission that was launched late last year. The LT will undoubtedly be a key player in this area of astronomical research. Affectionately known as SPRAT, the SPectrometer for the Rapid Acquisition of Transients will provide astronomers with the opportunity to rapidly observe and analyse the light from all manner of variable objects.
[full story]

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