The Liverpool Telescope is a 2.0 metre unmanned fully robotic telescope at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos on the Canary island of La Palma. It is owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University, with financial support from STFC.

Latest News
SPRAT
LJMU scientists announce the arrival of SPRAT, an exciting new instrument on the Liverpool Telescope
1300 GMT 5 Sep 2014

Astronomers from the Astrophysics Research Institute (ARI) of Liverpool John Moores University recently announced the successful commissioning of an exciting new instrument on the Liverpool Telescope to colleagues and collaborators at an international conference in Poland. The conference, which was held in Warsaw in early September, brought together researchers from across Europe who are interested in observing variables and "transients" - objects that vary in brightness suddenly and dramatically. The meeting focused on objects that will be discovered with the GAIA space telescope, an ESA mission that was launched late last year. The LT will undoubtedly be a key player in this area of astronomical research.

Affectionately known as SPRAT, the SPectrometer for the Rapid Acquisition of Transients will provide astronomers from LJMU, the rest of the UK, and overseas with the opportunity to rapidly observe and analyse the light from all manner of variable objects. SPRAT will be particularly useful for studying novae and type Ia supernovae - stars in binary systems that undergo sudden outbursts - and core-collapse supernovae, massive stars that at the end of their lives collapse under their own weight causing a massive explosion of light and energy. Both areas of research are of particular interest to astronomers at the ARI.
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Call for telescope proposals for semester 15A
1300 GMT 5 Sep 2014

The call for observing proposals on the Liverpool Telescope is now available. The deadline for submission of proposals is Friday 3rd October, 2014, 4pm GMT. Prospective users should read the call carefully, and note in particular that a new LaTex proposal form (ltpattv0p6.tex) and style file (ltpattv0p6.sty) is being used for semester 15A onwards. Users may also consult the Phase 1 proposal instructions page for details on how to prepare and submit a proposal, or contact Phase1 support directly.

RAS specialist discussion meeting on time domain astronomy with LT and LT2
1600 GMT 15 Aug 2014

Researchers in transient and time domain astronomy are invited to attend a Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) Specialist Discussion Meeting in London on Friday, 14 November, 2014. The discussion will focus on astronomy and astrophysics with the Liverpool Telescope and Liverpool Telescope 2. The aims of the meeting are to showcase the many varied programmes that are active on the Liverpool Telescope, to stimulate new collaborations and ideas, and to engage with the community regarding our plans for the future.
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SkyCam-A
Research Council confirms future Liverpool Telescope Operations funding
1600 GMT 6 Aug 2014

The Liverpool Telescope is delighted to announce confirmation of receipt of a grant for £250,000 per year from the U.K. Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC). This grant will support the operation of the LT over the next two years initially (staring 1 October 2014) as part of a five year Business Plan recently endorsed by the STFC's LT Oversight Committee. The funding ensures continuing access to the telescope for a wide range of astronomers and astrophysicists from Universities and Institutes across the UK and internationally.
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LightCurve
Rapid-response monitoring of a "nearby monster"
1500 GMT 17 June 2014

On April 27, 2013 many of the world's astronomers observed the brightest Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) ever detected by the Swift satellite. Named GRB 130427A, it was one of the most energetic nearby events ever encountered. At a redshift of z = 0.3399, which corresponds to a distance of only 3.6 billion light years, GRB 130427A was a truly unique and extraordinary "nearby monster".

GRBs trace the most energetic explosions in the Universe. Some are believed to occur after the merger of two compact objects - a pair of neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole. Others may be caused by the collapse of a rapidly-rotating massive star. The former are classified as short-GRBs, due to the very limited durations of their gamma-ray emission (less than a few seconds). The latter are classified as long-GRBs, since the mean duration of their "prompt emission" phase lasts longer than a few tens of seconds...
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NAM2014
Bumps, Burps and Bangs hit this year's National Astronomy Meeting in Portsmouth
1100 GMT 9 May 2014

The Liverpool Telescope team will once again be leading a session on Time Domain Astronomy at this year's U.K. National Astronomy Meeting. Entitled Bumps, Burps and Bangs - Transient and Time Domain Astronomy in the U.K., the two-block session has attracted the attention of researchers in the field from across the U.K. In all, 23 abstracts were submitted spanning topics in galactic, extra-galactic and solar system astrophysics. The schedule of oral presentations and a list of posters to be presented is now available...
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